Permanence Matters Campaigns for Literary Longevity

“Can you imagine how our world would be changed without meaning being memorialized by the written word? No Bible or Koran. No Gettysburg Address… no way to capture and sustain the great ideas, perspectives and whimsy of mankind,” (George H. Glatfelter, CEO, Glatfelter)

Permanence Matters, a division of global paper supplier Glatfelter, believes the best way to preserve books for future generations is by printing them on paper that lasts, rather than on the groundwood paper that’s being used in increasingly by publishers today. The organization argues that groundwood paper – the stuff that many first editions, bestsellers, literary prize winners and textbooks are printed on – begins showing wear & tear after just a few years of use and is unfit for standing the test of time. In addition, there are concerns that this increasing use of groundwood paper could result in serious consequences to our literary history if it continues. Some 1 million new titles printed on groundwood are entering the Library of Congress each year — and that’s only a fraction of the number of new books being added to library collections around the country (Permanence Matters).

To help spread their message, Permanence Matters turned to advertising agency BooneOakley to assist them with bringing about visual representations of the company’s mission: preserving the written word – forever. The result of BooneOakley’s creativity are some fantastic examples of print advertising that viewers of all ages can instantly connect with. Whimsical scenes from some pillars of literature (Treasure Island, Gone With the Wind and War of the Worlds) are beautifully combined with an infinity symbol, creating images that require little or no explanation.

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